Bitter pit control in apples
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Bitter pit control in apples

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Published by Ministry of Agriculture and Food in Toronto, Ont .
Written in English


Book details:

Edition Notes

StatementR.A. Cline.
SeriesFactsheet (Ontario. Ministry of Agriculture and Food)
ContributionsCline, R.A.
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL21820300M

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In the case of bitter pit this could be due to a localized Mg toxicity (Hopfinger and Poovaiah, ). According to Ferguson and Watkins () this Mg-induced pitting differs from true bitter pit but Burmeister and Dilley () found a correlation of bitter pit on Northern Spy apples with bitter pit-like symptoms induced by Mg 2+ salt. The effects of interactions between nutrition and environment on the mineral composition of fruits are considered, along with an integrated approach to orchard nutrition and bitter pit control, the influence of boron deficiency on fruit quality, and calcium accumulation in apple fruit. The cause of bitter pit: its contributing factors -- 3rd progress rpt. The control of bitter pit in the growing fruit -- 4th rpt. The experimental results in their relations to bitter pit -- 5th rpt. The cause and control of bitter pit with the results of experimental investigation. Description: 5 volumes: illustrations (some color. In book: Horticultural Reviews, Vol pp - ), and bitter pit in apple fruit (Ferguson and Watkins, Control of bitter pit in 'Honeycrisp' apples (Malus ×domes-tica) from.

Bitter pit in Cox's Orange Pippin and Worcester Pearmain apples stored for >4 months and 6 weeks, respectively, was effectively controlled by 4 sprays of M CaNO3 applied to the trees at day intervals from June to mid-Aug. [45, ]. Senescent breakdown in Cox's and rotting in Worcester Pearmain were also reduced. There was marked correlation between Gloeosparium spp. rots and bitter Cited by: ter pit (BP) will be an ever-growing challenge to the grower’s bottom line. Our group is now in the third season of a study focused on the development of practical recommendations growers can implement to reduce bitter pit losses in their ‘Honeycrisp’ orchards. Research objectives of the entire project include theFile Size: KB. Bitter pit in Cox's Orange Pippin apples stored for over 4 months and Worcester Pearmain apples stored for 6 weeks was most effectively controlled by 4 sprays of M calcium nitrate applied at day intervals from mid-June until mid-August. Although, in one trial on Cox, a similar measure of control was obtained with only 2 sprays or by post-harvest immersion for one minute in M calcium Cited by: From the foregoing statements the following facts regarding bitter - pit are to be considered in discussing control: (1) The disease has a very general geographical range. (2) Some varieties of apples are more susceptible than others, although probably none is immune.

The apples are also free from damage caused by bruises, brown surface discoloration, russeting, sunburn or sprayburn, limb rubs, hail, drought spots, scars, stem or calyx cracks, disease, insects, bitter pit, Jonathan spot, or damage by other means, or invisible water core after January 31st of the year following the year of production, except. COVID Resources. Reliable information about the coronavirus (COVID) is available from the World Health Organization (current situation, international travel).Numerous and frequently-updated resource results are available from this ’s WebJunction has pulled together information and resources to assist library staff as they consider how to handle coronavirus. Experiments with orchard spray treatments for the control of bitter pit in apples in Tasmania (Division of Plant Industry technical paper) [D Martin] on *FREE* shipping on qualifying offers. Part II is based on previously unpublished documents that deal with an investigation of the cause and control of a devastating disease of apples, bitter pit. McAlpine was reluctantly drawn into leading it, largely unaware that the Government Botanist, Professor A.J. Ewart, was jealous of him and wanted to lead the investigation himself.